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Showing posts with label Hong Kong. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hong Kong. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 19, 2019

A Tsim Sha Tsui Sign of the Times in Hong Kong

pole with directional signs for pedestrians that was bent down to the ground by protestors in Hong Kong
Early this evening in Tsim Sha Tsui at one of many sites where protestors gathered last night hoping to help students surrounded by police at the nearby Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Remains of Vehicle Set on Fire Sit for Days in a Hong Kong Street

Early this evening as I walked through Mong Kok, Hong Kong I saw something on Sai Yeung Choi Street that seemed remarkable even after seeing and experiencing so much recently in Hong Kong regarding the ongoing protests.

burned vehicle in Mong Kok


burned vehicle with ""便衣狗車" written on it


inside of heavily damage burned vehicle in Mong Kok


Using the word "dog" for "police", common practice for protestors in Hong Kong, the markings on the the vehicle "便衣狗車" claim it is a plainclothes police car. I can't confirm this is accurate. But the vehicle does look like some unmarked vehicles I have seen on multiple occasions set in the middle of a row of marked police vehicles making their way through the city. In any case, presumably the vehicle's current state is the result of protesters.

This tweet includes a video of a car on fire in Mong Kok which appears to be a perfect match in terms of vehicle type and location:

Perhaps just as remarkable that this car was lit on fire is that it was still sitting in the street. Another person commented on this issue yesterday:

So the car has been sitting there in this not so usable state at least for a couple of days. Of course this is far from Hong Kong's most pressing issue, which is one of many signs of just how widespread and intense the protests have been lately.

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Fleeing the Tear Gas in Hong Kong's Central Financial District

This afternoon I observed the interaction of protestors, police, media, medics, and onlookers in Central — Hong Kong's main financial and business district. Suddenly the police started firing numerous tear gas canisters and rounds before leaving the area.

The below video begins with a large crowd following the police as they move away from the area with the frontline black-clad protestors. At 1:49 in the video, as I am standing next to a CNN crew the tear gas canisters begin to fly. As I headed westward on Pedder Street directly away from the police, I thought that quite soon either the firing would stop or that I would be out of harms way. However, the number of tear gas canisters and the distance they reached was more intense than I expected.



For more context, here is the report by CNN's Ivan Watson that was wrapping up while I recorded the above video just as the police began shooting this round of tear gas:


Incredibly this tear gassing of protestors and many others is just a small part of the protest related events today in Hong Kong and seems to pale in comparison to some of them.

And thanks to the helpful Hongkongers who provided me with eyewashes after the tear gassing. I am fine now, folks. I can't say the same for some others here though.

Monday, November 11, 2019

Police Chase and Apprehend Protestors in Mong Kok, Hong Kong

Last night around 12:30 a.m. I thought all seemed relatively calm at my specific location in Mong Kok, Hong Kong. Certainly, it was much calmer than what I experienced related to the ongoing protests in Hong Kong at a nearby location in Mong Kok two nights earlier.

Suddenly, I saw a number of black-clad protestors running in my direction.

The video I took below captures that moment when all certainly was not calm and number of others including the police apprehending at least two people and a police officer forcibly removing the respirator of a person whose outwear I think indicates "Press" or "Media". Most of the action occurs during the first six minutes of the video. I decided to post the full version in order to share some of the immediate aftermath as well. There is much going on throughout. The video has not been edited in any way except for having been uploaded to YouTube.



It would be an understatement to say I have seen much since I returned to Hong Kong four days ago. It would be a bigger understatement to say much more has happened here regarding the protests during that time. Especially given today's terrible events which include police shooting a protestor, a police officer driving his motorcycle into a crowd, and protestors lighting a person on fire, it is easy to believe the protests and the reactions to them will escalate further.

Thursday, June 13, 2019

The Economist Depicts a Handcuffed Hong Kong

The statement about the extradition protests in Hong Kong on this week's cover of The Economist is rather . . . arresting.

Cover of The Economist depicting the word "Hong Kong" using handcuffs
Source


It seems safe to say that it won't be easy to get a complete copy of this issue in China. The image has all the stronger of a punch to me given that I spend most of my time in mainland China. I often associate Hong Kong with the greater freedoms and protections available there. An article in the magazine helps to explain the use of handcuffs on the cover and how the extradition law could negate important aspects of what Hong Kong offers:
With the threat of extradition, anyone in Hong Kong becomes subject to the vagaries of the Chinese legal system, in which the rule of law ranks below the rule of the party. Dissidents taking on Beijing may be sent to face harsh treatment in the Chinese courts. Businesspeople risk a well-connected Chinese competitor finding a way to drag them into an easily manipulated jurisdiction.

That could be disastrous for Hong Kong, a fragile bridge between a one-party state and the freedoms of global commerce.
More at The Economist in "The Rule of Law in Hong Kong".

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Students, Tear Gas, and Masks: Today's Hong Kong Extradition Protests in 42 Tweets

people protesting proposed extradition law in Hong Kong
Photo taken by Chung-wah Chow of the protest in Hong Kong today before police cracked down

The march in Hong Kong two days ago against a proposed extradition bill was not the end.

Today in Hong Kong people continued to protest. Today in Hong Kong the police responded with tear gas and more.

Below is a series of selected tweets covering a variety of topics regarding the protests that I shared after checking into Twitter this afternoon. They are presented here in the order I shared them, not the order in which the tweets originally occurred, with the exception of the first two since they provide overviews of what has motivated then protests. As usual, if you are viewing this post through an RSS reader and the images, videos, or referenced tweets don't tweets appear, try viewing the original post.

The last tweet was made not long before publishing this post. As it indicates, the protests haven't ended. What will happen next isn't at all clear.

















































Added note: Although there were relevant reports, the word "blood" in the original title was changed to "masks" since none of the above tweets directly mention them.

Monday, June 10, 2019

Protesting Against Extradition in Hong Kong

There was a big march in Hong Kong today:
Over a million people have joined a mass protest against the Hong Kong government’s controversial extradition bill, according to organisers. . . .

The protesters marched towards the legislature over an issue that has underscored divisions in society over trust in the legislature and the Chinese judicial system.

Hong Kong’s government first proposed legal amendments in February to allow the city to handle case-by-case extradition requests from jurisdictions with no prior agreements, most notably China and Taiwan.
To add to the many already out there, with permission I will pass on some photos of the protest shared by friends in Hong Kong. A few were shared publicly, and those are attributed. Most were shared privately, so out of care and such they aren't attributed.


"let Hong Kong be Hong Kong" sign


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill
Source: Chung-wah Chow


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill
Source: Chung-wah Chow


protest over Hong Kong's proposed extradition bill
Source: Chung-wah Chow

Monday, April 8, 2019

A Cantonese Opera in Hong Kong About Donald Trump

About a month and a half ago in Hong Kong, as I left the Yau Ma Tei metro station I noticed an advertisement for the new Cantonese opera "Trump On Show".

Trump On Show advertisement


Yes, this really exists:
Start with a performer playing President Trump. Then bring in a long-lost brother who was raised in China.

Throw in castmates portraying a ping-pong-loving Mao Zedong, a deal-seeking Kim Jong Un, Ivanka Trump and Mao’s power-hungry fourth wife.

They are singing. Opera. In Cantonese.

And, well, it’s complicated.
For more about those complications, read Mary Hui's piece about the Trumpian opera in The Washington Post, which includes some perspectives from the opera's creator, Li Kui-ming:
Li also studied the president’s quirks and habits — his penchant for fast food and television-watching habits — to develop Trump’s character.

Li, however, was struck by similarities between Mao and Trump.

“What they share in common is they both started a cultural revolution,” Li said.
Oh boy.

Trump wasn't the only Republican U.S. politician that I recently noticed in Hong Kong. Admittedly, it was a bit confounding to turn around at a bus stop in Kowloon Bay and think "Is that really Dick Cheney?".

Vice movie poster ad in Hong Kong


I don't expect to attend any "Trump on Show" performances, which opens April 12, or have anything worth saying about the movie "Vice". So this post is probably all you'll find about them here. I will update if I see any indications of a Hong Kong musical about George W. Bush though.

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

An Apparent Mismatch for a Name: Mini Jumbo Wuzhou Buses in Guangxi, China

Hong Kong formally names its minibuses, like the one which appeared in the previous post, "public light buses". Wuzhou, a city in the Chinese autonomous region Guangxi, also has minibuses. But instead of "public light bus" they have another name on them.

mini Jumbo Wuzhou Bus (梧州珍宝巴士)


The "Wuzhou" and "Bus" parts of the name "Jumbo Wuzhou Bus" make obvious sense. "Jumbo" is less clear, though, since these are minibuses. If that is the jumbo size then what's the mini size?

A larger bus can help begin to clear up the mystery.

full-sized Jumbo Wuzhou Bus


They have the same name on them, which is the name of a bus company. This is clearly stated in smaller Chinese print elsewhere on the buses.

Jumbo Wuzhou Bus logo


Like buses in Hong Kong, some buses have advertising.

full-sized Jumbo Wuzhou Bus with advertising


However, you won't see advertising quite like what's on the minibus in the previous post. Hongkongers have greater political rights and more freedom of speech than people in mainland China. The "Tell Right From Wrong, True From False" slogan was part of a campaign for the Labor Party's attempt to win a 2018 Kowloon West by-election. But China still limits Hongkongers' rights to a degree that leads some people to claim Hong Kong doesn't have real democracy. These limitations were evident in Kowloon West election when the Labor Party's original candidate, Lau Siu-lai, was barred from running due to her previous stances regarding Hong Kong's self-determination.

Back to more mundane matters . . . in Wuzhou there are buses in between the mini Jumbo Wuzhou Bus and the regular-sized Jumbo Wuzhou Bus in terms of size. So here are two mini-plus Jumbo Wuzhou Buses:

two mid-sized Jumbo Wuzhou Buses


The word "珍宝" in the Chinese name for Jumbo Wuzhou Bus would often be translated as "treasure". But it is also a loanword in Cantonese meaning "jumbo" because of its similar sound to the English word. Like in Hong Kong, Cantonese is a commonly spoken language in Wuzhou.

I can't shed more light on what inspired the choice of "jumbo". But if you want to dig more, it might be worth looking into the Guangzhou buses with a similar name and logo.

Monday, February 25, 2019

Trump's Tweets in the Hong Kong News

Tonight on the news as I waited for a ferry tonight in Hong Kong:


Donald Trump on the news in Hong Kong


A tweet by Donald Trump featured in the news in Hong Kong


A tweet by Donald Trump featured in the news in Hong Kong


China and US flags displayed on a news segment about the China - US trade discussions


Just a basic point that is part of a larger picture: Trump's tweets receive close attention, even here.

Friday, February 22, 2019

An Unexpected Visit to the Sunshine Kowloon Bay Cargo Centre in Hong Kong

I hadn't expected to arrive in Prince Edwards, Hong Kong, at 11:30 a.m. yesterday.

Oh, the location was expected. But the time was not since I had departed Jiangmen only 3.5 hours before, and a similar recent trip from a closer location, Zhongshan, had taken longer. Arriving earlier than expected was grand though.

I had expected to stop by the Mongkok Computer Centre yesterday afternoon. I had also expected during this visit I wouldn't be able to fully resolve the problem which had brought me there. But I hadn't expected that after some assistance, I would head to Kowloon Bay.

And I hadn't expected that yesterday I would find myself at the Sunshine Kowloon Bay Cargo Centre.

Sign for the Sunshine Kowloon Bay Cargo Centre


Some readers must be wondering if the Sunshine Kowloon Bay Cargo Centre is a fine building. It is.

Sunshine Kowloon Bay Cargo Centre in Kowloon Bay, Hong Kong


After entering the building, I hadn't expected that finding a way to the upper levels would be slightly tricky. Here is a later photo I took which which I believe captures somebody receiving friendly assistance to reach those levels:

ground floor of the Sunshine Kowloon Bay Cargo Centre


After finding the elevator and exiting it on the 2nd floor (what would be labeled the 3rd floor in the U.S.), I hadn't expected to see no signs of my intended destination. So I picked a direction and found myself in a distribution centre for Circle K, a convenience store chain.

Circle K distribution centre in the Sunshine Kowloon Bay Cargo Centre


Soon a person who hadn't expected me to be in the Circle K distribution centre explained (hollered) that I shouldn't be there. Then an older man who presumably wasn't surprised to see yet another person in the wrong place immediately guessed my intended destination and directed me there.

Thank you, sir.

Shortly after that, I found my destination.

Vcare location in the Sunshine Kowloon Bay Cargo Centre


When I left Hong Kong during the Lunar New Year holiday I hadn't expected to return so soon. I also hadn't expected that I would have significant problems with an external hard drive I had bought there. I had expected that having discarded the box would make resolving the problem more challenging. It did, but I hadn't expected that things would go as smoothly as they did nonetheless.

In short, the external hard drive I had bought has been replaced. As soon as I feel reasonably confident all is OK with it, I will be heading out of Hong Kong once more. While I wish the drive I had bought before had lived a long life, at least the experience of replacing it afforded opportunities to open my eyes to new things.

More about some of those things and also the new travel options in and out of Hong Kong someday.

I expect.

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

40 Photos Taken With a New Camera and Lens in Hong Kong

I had not originally planned to spend time in Hong Kong so early this year, but an urgent need for a new camera and lens changed things. Both in terms of options and prices, purchasing a camera in Hong Kong was a far better option than doing so in mainland China, especially given what I was seeking and that I was relatively close to Hong Kong. My previous camera and lens had both been in far-from-ideal states for some time. Although I found workarounds for some problems such as malfunctioning dials, dust buried deep in the sensor, and problematic autofocusing, their state certainly had affected how and what I photographed for a period of time. So there was some good that matters had reached a state where I was forced to upgrade (repairs weren't sensible given what they would cost).

I only stayed in Hong Kong long enough to purchase the camera & lens and to feel reasonably confident all was well with them. So below are 40 photos presented in the order they were taken with the theme "photos I took while testing my new camera and lens for a few days in Hong Kong", although I hope in the process to share yet a little more about Hong Kong. I won't get into technical details, but I'll share that all of the photos are unaltered "as is" from the jpeg files the camera produced, except reduced in size.

Scenes and locations were motivated by a variety of factors, including simply testing the camera under certain conditions and other pragmatic matters. I would have set the camera differently if I took some of these photos now or if I had known all of those pigeons were going to suddenly take off in my direction. I covered far fewer locations than typical for a Hong Kong stay. Still, I managed to capture scenes in areas such as Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, Central, Tsim Sha Tsui, Mong Kok, and Kowloon City.

Anyway, the photos are what they are. And of course, more will come.


Red lanterns at Lee Tung Avenue
Red lanterns at Lee Tung Avenue


Photographic moment at Lee Tung Avenue
Photographic moment at Lee Tung Avenue


birds at Kwan Kee Birds & Small Animals
Birds at . . .


Kwan Kee Birds & Small Animals
Kwan Kee Birds & Small Animals


Tram and Five Guys in Hong Kong
Tram and Five Guys


Vendor in Wan Chai
Vendor in Wan Chai


Arsenal Street tram stop on Hennessy Road
Arsenal Street tram stop on Hennessy Road


Playing in the fountain at Hong Kong Park
Playing in the fountain at Hong Kong Park


Children playing with sand scoopers at Hong Kong Park
Playing in the sand at Hong Kong Park


Little girl running at the Hong Kong Zoological and Botanical Garden
Running at the Hong Kong Zoological and Botanical Garden


De Brazza's monkeys at the Hong Kong Zoological and Botanical Garden
De Brazza's monkey spotting a human at the Hong Kong Zoological and Botanical Garden


Below the Glenealy Flyover in Hong Kong
Below the Glenealy Flyover


The Glenealy Flyover in Hong Kong
The Glenealy Flyover


Above the Glenealy Flyover
Above the Glenealy Flyover (and a change of light)


Looking up at night from the parade ground at Tai Kwun
Looking up from the parade ground at Tai Kwun


A local Young Master IPA at HK Brew Craft
A local Young Master IPA at HK Brew Craft


Fruit loops cones at Emack & Bolio's in Hong Kong
Fruit loops cones at Emack & Bolio's


Topman and Topshop in Hong Kong
Topman and Topshop


The Lunar Fantasy with Ancient Auspicious Animals at Times Square
The Lunar Fantasy with Ancient Auspicious Animals at Times Square


In a sea of flowers at the Lunar Fantasy with Ancient Auspicious Animals
Sea of flowers at the Lunar Fantasy with Ancient Auspicious Animals


Advertising in front of Times Square
Advertising in front of Times Square


Multistory escalator in Hysan Place
Multistory escalator in Hysan Place


View of Ma Tau Wai Road from the upper level of a Hong Kong double-decker bus
View of Ma Tau Wai Road from the upper level of a Hong Kong double-decker bus


Herbal tea stand in Kowloon City
Herbal tea stand in Kowloon City


Art at the Cattle Depot Artist Village
Art at the Cattle Depot Artist Village


Ma Tau Kok Road
Ma Tau Kok Road


policeman walking on a footbridge in Mong Kok
Footbridge on a Sunday in Mong Kok


Fish for sale at the Fa Yuen Street Market
Fish for sale at the Fa Yuen Street Market


Junk boat in Victoria Harbour
Junk in Victoria Harbour


Lunar New Year pig head sculpture lighted up at night at Harbour City
Lunar New Year pig sculpture at Harbour City


Photographing the Symphony of Lights from a Star Ferry boat
Photographing the Symphony of Lights from a Star Ferry boat


people walking in a pedestrian subway in Tsim Sha Tsui
Pedestrian subway in Tsim Sha Tsui


Looking down at the ground floor of the Chungking Mansions
Looking down at the ground floor of the Chungking Mansions


Top of the The Masterpiece skyscraper seen through the Victoria Dockside
Top of the The Masterpiece skyscraper seen through the Victoria Dockside


Family being photographed with a sculpture of the pig cartoon character McDull at the Avenue of the Stars
Photographic opportunity with the pig cartoon character McDull at the Avenue of the Stars


Pigeons taking flight at Kowloon Park
Pigeons taking flight at Kowloon Park


Sculpture of Miss 13 Dots at the Hong Kong Avenue of Comic Stars
Miss 13 Dots at the Hong Kong Avenue of Comic Stars


Looking down at a multistory escalator in Langham Place
Looking down at a multistory escalator in Langham Place


Fa Yuen Market at night
Fa Yuen Market


Public Light Bus and crowd in Mong Kok
Minibus and crowd in Mong Kok