Pages

Showing posts with label Hong Kong. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hong Kong. Show all posts

Monday, January 27, 2020

Receiving News of Kobe Bryant's Death in the Midst of Hong Kong Protests, a Spreading Virus, and a Lunar New Year

police blocking Portland Street in Mong Kok, Hong Kong
A blocked section of Portland Street next to Langham Place


While police nearby guarded a street blocked due to a long night of protests in Mong Kok, Hong Kong, a young man next to me exclaimed, "Whoah!"

When I looked at him he said, seemingly stunned, "Did you know Kobe Bryant died?"

"No. Wait, what?"

He showed me his phone.

mobile phone displaying New York Post article on Kobe Bryant's death


He then expressed his shock over the news and shared how he had been a fan of Bryant since being a child.

Kobe Bryant has a large number of fans in mainland China as well. Patrick Brzeski reported on how people there were saddened by the news:
By mid-afternoon, local time, the hashtag devoted to Bryant's death on Weibo had attracted an astounding 2.4 billion views and tens of millions of engagements, making it by far the most widely read and discussed topic of the day.

The reports of Bryant's death seemed only to compound the dismay many millions in China have been feeling over the deadly coronavirus that has plunged the country into crisis during the family holiday season of Lunar New Year. A common refrain on social media was a plea wishing that 2020 could simply be started over. . . .

Just three days ago, Bryant posted a happy Chinese New Year message to his own Weibo profile, where he has 9.2 million followers. "Xin Chun Kuai Le to my dear friends in China!" he wrote.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Momentarily Raising the Pepper Spray Canisters in Yuen Long, Hong Kong

Tuesday evening I was so occupied in Yuen Long, Hong Kong, that I didn't eat dinner. Also that evening, some police officers on Castle Peak Road suddenly started shaking their pepper spray canisters and made it clear they were ready to use them. We were rather close to a local district councillor who was... pepper sprayed by police.

four Hong Kong police officers wearing riot gear — three holding pepper spray canisters


After midnight I found a good meal of dumplings & noodles elsewhere in Hong Kong. I expected that wouldn't be a problem. I did not expect the pepper spray threat at a location close to the Hong Lok Road light rail stop and down the road from where a recent protest rally was held.

Yet again, I want to spend more time composing my thoughts and photos regarding the rally and related events. For now I will just add that shortly after the police stopped blocking the area, the district councillor was cleaned up and seemingly in good spirits as he gave interviews. I believe he was later arrested. Still sorting out what happened that chaotic night.

Monday, January 20, 2020

Momentarily Raising a Gun in Tin Shui Wai, Hong Kong

Tonight I had dinner at a cheap Italian-style place in Tin Shui Wai, Hong Kong. Also tonight, at a nearby rally a police officer suddenly appeared in front of me and then raised his gun.

policeman holding a gun


The food I ordered wasn't especially Italian. But I expected that, and for the price I was happy with it. I wasn't expecting the gun though.

I need more time to compose my thoughts and photos regarding the rally and related events. For now I will just add that the police officer soon lowered his gun without aiming it at anything. I don't know what concerned him. At the time I was more focused on him than whatever he was looking at behind me.

Friday, January 17, 2020

Graffiti and More Xiangqi at Soy Street

Although tear gas hasn't lately poured out of a pedestrian underpass on Soy Street in Mong Kok, Hong Kong, signs of the protests can still be found there.

"People Should Not Be Afraid Of Their Goverment [sic]" graffiti
Photo taken evening of January 16, 2020


And the xiangqi games go on as well . . .

Crowd surrounding two people playing xiangqi
Photo taken the same evening

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

From Tear Gas to Xiangqii on Soy Street in Hong Kong

Around 1 a.m. on the 9th of last November, police fired tear gas into a pedestrian underpass on Soy Street in Mong Kok, Hong Kong. The people on the other side likely weren't the intended target, but they still had to flee.



Such sights were common in Mong Kok during those days.

Where an older man had been sitting while wearing a gas mask, yesterday near midnight a crowd watched two men play a variation of xiangqi in which most of the pieces are initially flipped over to hide their identity and mixed up before setting them on the board.

men playing a xiangqi variant in Mong Kok, Hong Kong


That no gas masks were in sight or at all expected to be needed is one of the many signs of how much has changed in Mong Kong between two months ago and now.

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Cats, Fashion, and Orwell All Bestselling Books in Hong Kong

At the Eslite Spectrum bookstore in Hong Kong, "1984" tops 5th place "If Cats Disappeared From The World" in the store's Top 10 Bestselling Fiction Books.

"1984" and "If Cats Disappeared From The World" on a Top 10 Bestsellers shelf


In the store's Top 10 Bestselling Illustrated Books another cat book, "Hong Kong Shop Cats", holds 5th place. It's topped by "Lives of 50 Fashion Legends".

"The Lives of 50 Fashion Legends" and "Hong Kong Shop Cats" on a Top 10 Bestsellers shelf


Just some books selling well in Hong Kong to ponder . . .

Monday, January 6, 2020

A Face Mask Left Behind on New Year's Day in Hong Kong

I never intended to not post here for such an extended period of time. I certainly am not lacking in material or thoughts. I could post about fresh blood on a wall bordering a garden in Sheung Shui, a young woman stomping on a man's head in Mong Kok, or notes of hope in Central — all in Hong Kong.

For now, here is photo of a face mask, bricks, and a wheelbarrow in the middle of a street in Causeway Bay after a very large New Year's Day protest march and . . . more.

face mask, bricks, and wheelbarrow on a street


While the intended purposes of the items seem clear to me, I don't what exact event led to this state. I don't expect to ever know, but a chaotic scene seems likely. Plenty of such scenes played out on New Year's Day in Hong Kong. And more have since.

Wednesday, January 1, 2020

Before and After the New Year on a Street in Hong Kong

Just before 11 p.m in Hong Kong New Year's Eve at Sai Yeung Choi Street South seemed moderately usual:

Sai Yeung Choi Street South just before New Year's


Around 3 a.m. New Year's at Sai Yeung Choi Street South had a different feeling though:

Police at Sai Yeung Choi Street South


Happy New Year.

Tuesday, December 31, 2019

Wednesday, December 25, 2019

A Beatdown and a Blockade During Christmas in Hong Kong

As anticipated, there were large-scale protests yesterday in Hong Kong, and the protests continue today. I will post more about them later, including some of the ways they intermixed with the Christmas holiday spirit. For now, I will just share two photos I shared on Twitter recently along with the comments I made there.

I took the first photo not long before 2 a.m. this morning.

woman wearing a Santa cap looking at a man on the ground
Man grabs a young woman's breast.
Crowd beats man.
Man pretends to be unconscious to avoid more pain.
Hong Kong's top riot police arrive.

The incident in Mong Kok didn't appear to have any direct connection to the protests, except that the large number of protestors around probably meant a more intense response, both from the protestors and the police. There is much more I can say and share regarding what happened, and perhaps that will happen as it touches on a number of issues. I will add that the only obvious involvement by the police was chasing away protestors in the area which enabled an ambulance to safely take the man away. I was told the young woman didn't wish to formally report the man. She did not trust the police would handle the matter fairly, which says a lot about how some people in Hong Kong view the police these days.

The second photo was taken several hours later.

debris set by protestors to block Nathan Road
If you thought that the protests in Hong Kong would be over by 5am today, you'd be wrong.

The photo was taken at Nathan Road also in Mong Kok. This certainly isn't the most remarkable photo I took of the recent protests, especially since they were far more intense earlier. But the scene is notable because the protests appeared to be lasting longer into the morning than some other protests that occurred in Mong Kok during the past couple of months.

Tuesday, December 24, 2019

Anticipating a Lively Christmas in Hong Kong

Compared to November, the protests in Hong Kong have been relatively calm lately. However, they continue, and there are signs they will soon intensify.

yellow Hong Kong protest signs with a Christmas theme


It could be a rather eventful Christmas in Hong Kong. 

Thursday, December 19, 2019

Photographing a Fisher and a Photographer at Victoria Harbour

He only had a line, yet he fished. He only had a camera, yet he photographed.


man photographing a fisher at Victoria Harbour
At Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong

Wednesday, December 18, 2019

Hong Kong Buses with The Force

Four years ago I shared photos of displays with a Christmas touch promoting the release of Disney's Star Wars: The Force Awakens at the IAPM shopping center in Shanghai. I haven't seen anything as grandiose in Hong Kong for this year's release of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker. Perhaps that is just because I haven't actively looked for anything. In any case, the best I can do now is to share photos of some of the buses I have seen in Hong Kong with advertising for the movie.

double-decker bus with advertising for Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker


double-decker bus with advertising for Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker


double-decker bus with advertising for Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker


Given my previous interest in advertising on Hong Kong trams, I will keep an eye out for any Star Wars trams. No luck yet though.

Thursday, December 12, 2019

O Fortuna, the Wheel Brings Another Message

First there were ballerinas with umbrellas above "Free HK".  Then there was blackness. Now, there is a different message.

"Stop Police Cruelty" graffiti on pedestrian bridge to Central Piers with the Hong Kong Observation Wheel in the background


The "Stop Police Brutality" graffiti is on a number of beams on a pedestrian bridge connecting to the Central Piers in Hong Kong. In all of the examples I saw, they were placed directly on top of areas that had been painted black to cover previous graffiti.

two examples of "Stop Police Cruelty" graffiti on pedestrian bridge to Central Piers


It is now the predominant graffiti design on the bridge, though there is at least one example of partially symbolic graffiti expressing the protest slogan "Five Demands, Not One Less".

"Five Demands Not One Less" (using symbols) graffiti on pedestrian bridge to Central Piers with the Hong Kong Observation Wheel in the background


However, there appeared to be more examples of untouched painted-black areas than of recent graffiti. This is consistent with what I have seen in various parts of Hong Kong, whether Central, Tsing Yi, or Yau Tsim Mong. Newer protest graffiti, posters, and other forms of visible expression continue to replace older ones, but overall there is far less now compared to a few weeks ago.

And the wheel keeps turning . . . 

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

The Good Shop in Hong Kong

As one of Hong Kong's major shopping districts, you won't have problems finding a variety of items for sale in Causeway Bay. But if you simply want something good, there is a place on Lockhart Road to check out.

The Good Shop store in Hong Kong


On the day I passed, items ranging from maneki-neko (Japanese lucky cat) figurines to stuffed toy carrots to sim cards. Perhaps the selection will change in the future, but it should still be good.

Friday, December 6, 2019

Protecting the Traffic Control Boxes in Hong Kong

Several weeks ago around 3:30 A.M. on November 11, protestors lit an electrical traffic control box on fired on Nathan Road in Mong Kok, Hong Kong.



Many other traffic control boxes were decommissioned in one way or another during recent protests. This raises the question, "How does a city restore traffic control boxes while also not making them prone to similar repeat attacks?"

An attempt to address this question now exists at the intersection of Nathan Road with Kansu Street and Gascoigne Road in Yau Ma Tei, Hong Kong.

traffic control box surrounded by secure bars in Yau Ma Tei, Hong Kong

I didn't see any obvious way to open the barred protection. This may be a strike against usability, but that's probably the point.

Sunday, December 1, 2019

Precariously Photographing in Hong Kong

I hope he got a fantastic photo. At least he didn't fall.

man leaning over a high ledge to take a photo


Later I'll share photos not featuring photographers from today's police-approved (until they decided otherwise in the middle of it) protest march in Hong Kong that began in Tsim Sha Tsui.